Student Co-Curator, Designing the Second Skin: Giorgio di Sant'Angelo 1971-1991

From Parsons The New School of Design:

As part of a final group project for the graduate course, "Fashion Curation", I curated and displayed a garment from the archive of designer Giorgio di Sant'Angelo. This incredible sheer jumpsuit is covered with sequins and was once modeled by Naomi Campbell for an editorial shoot featured in Harper's Bazaar (U.S.) in 1991.

Parsons presents the first New York exhibition of the work of designer Giorgio di Sant’Angelo, an innovative Italian-born American designer from the 1960s through 1980s who explored the ways in which garments truly become the wearer’s second skin. Playing with texture, transparency, and newly discovered fabric technology, Sant’Angelo examined the relationship between exposure and concealment. A highlight from the exhibition is a nude sequined jumpsuit worn by Naomi Campbell and featured in an editorial shoot for Harper’s Bazaar in 1991. The works on view are drawn from the Parsons Fashion Archive—a collection of nearly 10,000 garments, including a number of pieces donated to Parsons by the Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Sant’Angelo works were originally donated to the Met by Parsons faculty member Martin Price, Sant-Angelo’s design assistant and partner, who has been an instrumental force in keeping Sant’Angelo’s spirit alive. The exhibition is curated by graduate students in the MA Fashion Studies program, the MA in the History of Decorative Arts and Design program, and the MArch program at Parsons under the supervision of faculty member Francesca Granata.


Curatorial Intern, African Headwear: Beyond Fashion

From the Dallas Museum of Art

The exhibition African Headwear: Beyond Fashion presents a selection of headwear that was once—and in some instances still is—worn by kings and chiefs, religious practitioners, warriors, and men, women, and infants in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. It demonstrates the importance of headwear as a means of nonverbal communication about the wearer’s position in society and the stages in his or her life cycle. Above all, the exhibition celebrates the artistry of the hats, which are fashioned from natural materials and found objects in the local environment, as well as from foreign products that became available through trade or conquest.


Curatorial Intern, The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

From the Dallas Museum of Art: 

From November 13, 2011 to February 12, 2012, the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) will host The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, the first exhibition devoted to the celebrated French couturier. The DMA is the first of two U.S. venues to host this critically acclaimed international exhibition after its premier at the organizing institution, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. The exhibition also marks the first time that the DMA will present an exhibition dedicated to exploring the art of contemporary fashion. Dubbed fashion’s “enfant terrible” from the time of his first runway shows in the 1970s, Jean Paul Gaultier is indisputably one of the most important fashion designers of recent decades. Very early on, his avant‐garde fashions reflected an understanding of a multicultural society’s issues and preoccupations, shaking up—with invariable good humor—established societal and aesthetic codes. More of a contemporary installation than a fashion retrospective, this major exhibition—which the couturier considers to be a creation in its own right—features approximately 140 ensembles spanning over 35 years from the designer’s couture and ready-to-wear collections, along with their accessories, and numerous archival documents. Many of these extraordinary pieces have never before been exhibited, including a costume from one of Almodóvar’ s recent films and a leather corset that will be shown for the first time during the DMA’s presentation.